Events

Below are the events we organized prior to the Fall 2015 semester. For upcoming events, please visit us here.

Using Photos to Document Research & Experience

Going beyond instagrammed, overhead, filtered photos of our food before we chow down, there's much more than meets the eye. From DSLRs to point-and-shoots to the camera on the back of every cell phone on the market, the access to capturing everyday images is greater than ever. How can we use this tool effectively to document research and experience? Coming up this Monday, March 23, Food-Writer-in-Residence Naomi Duguid and our very own Dean and VP Academic Rick Halpern will lead a workshop on exactly that in the Culinaria Kitchen Lab!
 
Date: 
Monday, March 23, 2015 - 10:00 to 11:30
Location: 
University of Toronto Scarborough
1265 Military Trail
Toronto, ON M1C 1A4
Canada
Projects: 

WORKSHOP: Strategies for Eating Well (on a student budget)

The Culinaria Research Project and UTSC Department of Historical and Cultural Studies are collaborating to bring you this food discussion workshop! Writer-in-residence Naomi Duguid (food-culture-focused traveler, writer, and photographer) will guide you toward how to shop and eat smart. We’re talking food for thought and ideas about food & survival for UTSC student life.
 
Bring your food hopes and frustrations to the (HANDS-ON!) discussion.
Offered once this semester, with just 15 spots available, you do not want to miss out!
Sign up by sending an email to Carmen Yung (culinaria@utsc.utoronto.ca).
 
 
Date: 
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 - 14:00 to 17:00
Location: 
University of Toronto Scarborough
1265 Military Trail
Toronto, ON M1C 1A4
Canada
Projects: 

March with Naomi Duguid

Please join us in welcoming our first writer-in-residence, Canadian food writer, ethnographer and photographer Naomi Duguid! We're very excited to have her on board for March where she'll be hosting several events, and workshops for our students, faculty and public! Head over to our blog post to find out more about Naomi.
 
Here is the complete list of events for MARCH with NAOMI DUGUID:
***Please note: most events require registration (which really just means a quick "I'd love to attend, please put my name down!" note). RSVP with the title of the workshop in the subject line to Carmen Yung.

 

 

 

 
Date: 
Sunday, March 1, 2015 - 00:00 to Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 17:00
Location: 
University of Toronto Scarborough
1265 Military Trail
Toronto, ON M1C 1A4
Canada

TALK: Transpacific Circuits, Chinese Restaurants and the Movement of Labor and Capital during Chinese Exclusion, 1915-1943

A talk by Heather Lee. She received her PhD from Brown University in American Studies in May 2014 and is currently the Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at MIT. 
 

This talk tells the ironic story of how anti-Chinese laws helped foster the ubiquitous presence of Chinese restaurants in the United States. While it barred the entry of Chinese laborers, the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and its various amendments unintentionally stimulated the formation of ethnic businesses through a system of visa preferences. Focusing on New York, which houses the oldest, continuously inhabited Chinatown in the United States, it explains how a 1915 legal precedent granted merchant status to restaurant owners and, therefore, motivated Chinese immigrants to become restaurateurs. Based on archival research and interviews conducted in China, Hong Kong, and New York, my talk explores how, in circumnavigating immigration laws, the Chinese developed a sophisticated system for shuttling labor and capital across the Pacific that accounts for, among other things, the Chinese restaurant industry’s rapid growth in the early twentieth century. Merchant status enabled Chinese immigrants to enter the United States legally and to sponsor relatives to do so as well. On the basis of that loophole, Chinese immigrants built what I call a “migration oriented business strategy” through which thousands were able to defy restrictions on their entry. The Chinese creatively stretched the meaning of visa categories to bypass restrictive immigration laws and shepherded transpacific capital past America’s gatekeepers. This research uncovers the formative role U.S. immigration law had on ethnic business like Chinese restaurants, and suggests how further study of ethnic capitalism should consider the dynamic interaction between exclusionary legal policy and the adaptive strategies of immigrant entrepreneurs.

 
 
Thursday, March 12, 4:00PM
Room AA160
UTSC
 
Date: 
Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 04:00
Location: 
University of Toronto Scarborough
1265 Military Trail
Toronto, ON M1C 1A4
Canada
Projects: 

Traditional Chinese Medicine: Theories & Practices

On Thursday, March 5, UTSC Health Studies and the Culinaria Initiative are proud to present Traditional Chinese Medicine: Theories & Practices, a two-part event featuring three special guests. Sought-after local TCM practitioner Angela Warburton (Centre for Integrated Healing, Urban Wellness and various health segments on Steve & Chris) and Chef and food activist Joshna Maharaj (Assistant Director of Food Services and Executive Chef, Ryerson Food Services) will lead the early afternoon session in the Culinaria Kitchen lab, while TCM historian/theoretician Dr. Stephen Jackowicz (University of Bridgeport, Adelphi University) will give a lecture on TCM, exploring the relevancy of a healing art that is thousands of years old from the East to the modern, technology-dependant world of the 21st cenury West.
 
 
 
The program will be as follows:
In the Kitchen: Basic Food Applications in TCM
Culinaria Kitchen Lab, RC264 12:30 - 2:30PM
TCM practitioner Angela Warburton and Chef and Food Activist Joshna Maharaj bring the foundations of TCM principles of nutrition, and the preparation of health-offering dishes to the Culinaria Kitchen Lab. This lecture-demonstration and tasting will introduce the fundamentals of TCM “food as medicine” and demonstrate how simple dishes and specific ingredients can be curative, in the context of the TCM understanding of health, disease, and cure.
 
In the Classroom: TCM History, Theories and Practices
HLTD04: Special Topics in Health, MW120, 3 - 5PM
Join us for a discussion and lecture with a TCM historian/theoretician and TCM practitioner. Angela Warburton and Stephen Jackowicz will look at the place of this ancient eastern healing art in the 21st century west. Together, they will explore how overarching socio-economic forces have created a unique style of TCM, and how this is modeled in the clinical setting.
 
 
Space is highly limited! RSVP on Eventbrite by Monday, March 2, 2015.
Thanks to IITS we will be live streaming both sessions! Details on how to tune in will be posted soon. 
 
Date: 
Thursday, March 5, 2015 - 12:30 to 17:00
Location: 
University of Toronto Scarborough
1265 Military Trail
Toronto, ON M1C 1A4
Canada

How Beer Traveled the World

Most every society has fermented alcoholic beverages—Mexican pulque, Peruvian chicha, Japanese sake, Chinese baijiu, Indian palm toddy, African sorghum beer—but a particular variety, German lager beer, has largely displaced these local brewing traditions to become a global consumer icon. This talk examines how European beer traveled the world over the last two hundred years through networks of trade, migration, and colonialism. It pays particular attention to the role of taste in the reception of beer. The talk concludes by comparing the recent spread of craft brewing to earlier migrations of beer.

Jeffrey Pilcher is a Professor in the Department of Historical and Cultural Studies at the University of Toronto Scarborough.  He has been a leading figure in the emerging scholarly field of food history. From an early research focus on Mexico and Latin America, he has expanded his scope to food in world history. He is the author of ¡Que vivan los tamales! Food and the Making of Mexican Identity (1998), The Sausage Rebellion: Public Health, Private Enterprise, and Meat in Mexico City (2006), and Food in World History (2006). His latest book, Planet Taco: A Global History of Mexican Food (2012), seeks to historicize authenticity and show how Mexico’s national cuisine developed through global interactions, particularly with Mexican American cooks.  His current book project examines the world history of beer over the past two hundred years.

A reception will follow the talk.  This event is sponsored by the Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, UTSC, the Department of History, UTSG, and Mill Street Brewery.

Limited seats. To register, click HERE.

If you have any questions about this event, please contact paula.hastings@utoronto.ca

Date: 
Monday, November 24, 2014 - 16:00 to 17:30
Location: 
University of Toronto Scarborough
1265 Military Trail
Ralph Campbell Lounger, BV380
Toronto, ON M1C 1A4
Canada

CALL FOR PROPOSALS! CAFS

Call for Proposals 10th Annual Assembly of the Canadian Association for Food Studies: Capital Ideas: Nourishing Debates, Minds and Bodies
May 30 – June 2, 2015, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario
 
To encourage collaboration and to better reflect the broad range of important work happening in this field, we encourage academics and other researchers to submit proposals for any of the following formats,
 
All submissions due on January 5th, 2015 except for Exploration Gallery submissions due on March 15, 2015. Paper submissions and exploration gallery proposals received after these dates will only be considered if space permits.
 
The Canadian Association for Food Studies (CAFS) will host its tenth annual assembly at University of Ottawa from May 30 – June 2, 2015 in conjunction with the 2015 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. Founded in 2005, CAFS promotes critical, transdisciplinary scholarship in the broad area of food systems: production, distribution, consumption, and waste management. CAFS members are drawn from an array of disciplines including adult education, agriculture, anthropology, economics, environmental studies, health studies, home economics, human nutrition, geography, literature, psychology, philosophy, policy studies, public health, rural studies, sociology, social work and urban planning. CAFS membership is open to academics, students, policy makers, community workers, professionals, practitioners, and others interested in food studies research. CAFS recognizes the need for transdisciplinary research on food issues both within and outside of academia in response to societal needs. The conference is an opportunity to share knowledge in a number of domain areas such as: informing and critiquing policy, assessing and mobilizing the outcomes of community-based work, and demonstrating the health, social, economic, political, cultural, spiritual and environmental impacts of food systems.
For more information click HERE.
Date: 
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 17:15 to Monday, January 5, 2015 - 17:15
Location: 
University of Ottawa
75 Laurier Ave
Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5
Canada

Local Fall Flavours


This hands-on (yes, you'll be cooking too!) food demonstration is the final event in UTSC's Local Food Challenge! With support from the Greenbelt Foundation, UTSC along with ten other institutions were chosen to incorporate more local foods into their menus. The focus for Local Fall Flavours is to give you some ideas for tasty dishes that can be easily prepared on a student budget. And yes, it's been strategically scheduled so that you can eat whatever is cooked for lunch! The Culinaria Kitchen Lab is located on the first floor of R-Wing, between the R-Space lounge and the stairs that lead up to the old gym. Be sure to wear closed-toe shoes and it's also a good idea to bring an apron as we only have a handful.
 
*TIP: Food tastes even better the next day so don't be afraid of bringing in a container or two to bring for any leftovers.
*This event is FREE to students.
 
Space is limited so sign up today!
Date: 
Thursday, November 20, 2014 - 11:00 to 13:00
Location: 
University of Toronto Scarborough
1265 Military Trail
Culinaria Kitchen Lab R264
Scarborough, ON M1C 1A4
Canada
Projects: 

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